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Citation Styles

Help with APA, MLA, and Turabian/Chicago citation styles for in-text citations and reference lists/works cited.

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Academic Honesty from the YU Honor Code

York University is committed to academic integrity. Academic integrity is essential to the success of the University's educational and transformational missions, and violations of academic integrity constitute serious offenses against the entire collegiate community. This academic integrity policy and Honor Code is designed to guide students as they prepare assignments, take examinations, and perform the work necessary to complete their degree requirements. View the full Honor Code for more information.


Plagiarism

Many people think of plagiarism as copying another's work or borrowing someone else's original ideas. But terms like "copying" and "borrowing" can disguise the seriousness of the offense:

According to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, to "plagiarize" means:

  • to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own
  • to use (another's production) without crediting the source
  • to commit literary theft
  • to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source

In other words, plagiarism is an act of fraud. It involves both stealing someone else's work and lying about it afterward.

All of the following are considered plagiarism:

  • turning in someone else's work as your own
  • copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit
  • failing to put a quotation in quotation marks
  • giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation
  • changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit
  • copying so many words or ideas from a source that it makes up the majority of your work, whether you give credit or not (see our section on "fair use" rules)

Most cases of plagiarism can be avoided, however, by citing sources. Simply acknowledging that certain material has been borrowed and providing your audience with the information necessary to find that source is usually enough to prevent plagiarism. 

(from http://plagiarism.org/article/what-is-plagiarism)